Thinking of getting Sky Q? Don’t bother just yet

Sky Q is being pushed heavily by the company as the new way to watch Sky TV, with Ultra HD 4K availability and allowing people in different rooms to watch different TV channels at the same time. But, as this article will explain, Sky Q still has many teething problems.

Sky Engineer advised me not to buy Sky Q for at least 12 months

I recently had a visit from a Sky Engineer to replace some damaged cable in my house. While he was visiting, I asked him what he thought of Sky Q.

“Don’t bother mate” he said.

He then went on to tell me that there were far to many teething problems with the service and that he believed it shouldn’t have been released to the public so soon.

So what are the problems with Sky Q?

The most common issues being reported by Sky customers with the service are:

  • the new menu system (known in the industry and the Electronic Program Guide (EPG) is accused by many traditional Sky users as being clunky and somewhat laggy
  • the blue light on the front of the Sky Q box is too bright and distracting and can’t be permanently switched off
  • problem with software updates
  • a persistent “You can’t watch TV right now as there is a connectivity problem” error

Why are Sky keen to push Sky Q?

Sky Q relies heavily on broadband internet and local area networking to download programs. It is a move towards streaming services and away from the traditional satellite system used by BSkyB for many years.

In addition, the Sky boxes produced by Samsung have been expensive for Sky to buy, whereas the Sky Q and additional Sky Mini boxes are cheaper to manufacture without the need for engineers to run lots of cables from room to room for those who require Sky Multiroom.

The future of Sky Q

There’s no doubt that Sky Q is on it’s way to being an awesome TV service, but right now it just isn’t quite up to scratch. That said, Sky have invested heavily in the technology and the company will only push to make sure it’s improve.

Verdict: definitely a service that traditional Sky customers will eventually want to upgrade to, but perhaps not until the bugs have been ironed out.

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